Normal Dog Sociability Levels

This post has been updated! Please visit our new post for the most up-to-date information.

9 responses to “Normal Dog Sociability Levels

  1. Although my older BC (Arie) likes to play, there is a time and place, and near agility, herding, or other structured activity is NOT it!

  2. Love this. I have a dog selective dog and she takes some management, but I know her well enough on how to handle intros, and when she’s never going to integrate with another dog. I’m just very blessed she is fine with my pack and very seperated play.

  3. Nice post. I’m wondering the source of the graph or the information on the graph?

  4. Mardi – The text for post was taken from BADRAP’s website. http://www.badrap.org/dogdog-tolerance

  5. I’m not such a fan of the labels. Dogs’ behavior changes in different situations. At least in rescue, we do not make blanket statements and must educate each person regarding a dog’s personality, which cannot be summed up by one of the labels written in this post.

  6. I have a very dog aggressive, three-legged pittie. I love her to death, but we have to be VERY careful and she simply cannot be around other dogs. She gets so aggressive on leash that she will bite me. :( I got her after she was involved in a dog fight, and I was led to believe that she was the “victim”. I am now fairly certain that she was equally culpable, if not the aggressor.

  7. My 7 y/o herding dog is a rescue and she would fall somewhere between dog selective and dog aggressive on this graph.

    We avoid unfamiliar dogs entirely because I can’t be sure their handlers will, well, HANDLE the situation. She has limitations (don’t we all!), and I don’t need to take the time and put her through rediscovering them with each well-meaning dog walker. Before I let her meet another dog, both dog and handler need to pass my sniff-test. :)

    We’ve been working on introducing her successfully to neutral/calm dogs with a trainer, she has made steady progress on realizing that her options go beyond confrontation.

  8. Pingback: When Your Dog is a Bully | Dr. Ruth Roberts

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s