Monthly Archives: August 2013

[Mostly] Wordless Wednesday

Photo by Stefano Mortellaro

Photo by Stefano Mortellaro

“Meow” means “Woof” in Cat.

– George Carlin

Opting In

We’ve all known that parent: the mom who enters her toddler in beauty pageants because she wanted to be a beauty queen when she was younger, the dad who pushes his son into organized sports to relive his glory days as the star quarterback for his home team. Whether it’s theater, academics, swimming, music, or something else, we’ve known the parent who lost sight of the child in front of them as they pursued the child they had always dreamed of having (or perhaps of being).

It’s natural to dream big and to want the best for those you love. Parents dream of their children becoming the next president or the next famous chef. They look at all of the amazing potential that their child has and they want wonderful things for them. This is normal, and to a certain degree it’s healthy.

Photo by Jesse Moore

Photo by Jesse Moore

We’ve all known great parents who followed their children’s dreams, supporting their son or daughter as they explored their own interests. Whether it’s learning about cars or about horses, we’ve known parents who followed their children on paths they never would have chosen on their own, and we’ve watched as the children thrived.

We’ve also seen this same normal, healthy desire to help their children have a better life turn dark. We’ve seen parents scream at Little League umpires or require their children to practice something so frequently and obsessively that the child’s social life or rest time is negatively impacted. Just like so much in life, balance is important.

Dogs are not children. We choose the dogs we bring into our life, and once we bring them home they stay with us unless we choose otherwise. They never grow up and move away. They eat when we feed them, sleep when and where we allow them to, and don’t leave our houses unless we permit it.

One of my favorite exercises to assign to my clients is the “perfect day” thought exercise. I ask them to tell me about their dog’s perfect day. If their dog got to decide, how would he choose to spend his day? What would he want to do? Which ten activities would he include in his perfect day? Chasing rabbits? Rolling in deer poop? Playing with other dogs? Swimming? Sunbathing? Snuggling? Eating roast beef? Digging up your lawn? If your dog got to call the shots, how would he spend his time?

It’s important to remember that dogs are individuals. Your dog is his own self. He has his own thoughts, likes, and dislikes. He’s aware of his world, and he perceives it differently than you, your other dog, or your previous dog of that breed. He is capable of making choices, and he has opinions about things. When was the last time you asked him what he lives for?

Here’s something to consider: dogs cannot opt out of relationships. They can check out, they can act out, but they cannot get out unless they act so far outside of their owner’s standards of acceptable behavior that they are euthanized or rehomed. They have the cognitive abilities of two- to five-year-old children, and like parents it is our responsibility to watch their behavior to learn what’s working and what’s not working for them in their world.

There’s a common recommendation in the agility and other dog sport worlds for young, anxious, distractible, independent, or enthusiastic dogs. Convention states that unless the dog’s owner is the center of his universe, their relationship is somehow fatally flawed. In order to become the center of his universe, owners are advised to prevent their dog from doing anything he enjoys that doesn’t include the owner.

If we follow this recommendation to its conclusion, it’s easy to see how it could be quite effective. If your adolescent dog loves to play with other dogs more than he loves agility, never allowing him to play with other dogs may indeed increase his enthusiasm for agility. If your child loves to surf the web more than she loves to play the violin, taking away her computer access may indeed make her more likely to practice her violin. If it’s the only game in town, it’s going to be better than nothing.

As a good parent, you might require your child to practice her violin for a certain amount of time before you let her log on to the web, and as a good dog owner you may ask your dog to do something for you (perhaps heel politely to the play area or sit and look at you) before you allow him to play with his doggy friends. Balance is important. But if you never allow your child to log on to the computer or never allow your dog to play with his friends out of some notion that letting them be themselves will harm your own goals, is that really the relationship you want to foster?

It’s normal for us to dream big, whether you’re gazing at a new baby human or a new baby dog. Both are full of possibilities, and it’s wonderful that we want the best for them. But in our quest to help those we love achieve greatness, let’s not lose sight of the individual in front of us. If you just pay attention, your dog will tell you what they need.

Layla told me that she didn’t enjoy agility trials but loves competing in rally obedience. Dobby told me that he would rather be petted under his chin than along his sides. Mischief frequently tells me that because she’s still young and learning about her world, she needs a moment to just sit quietly and watch the other dogs work in class or get used to the commotion of a new environment before she can focus on me. While their opinions may not always jive with my own goals for them, my respect for them as individuals is such that I am willing to listen, and to comply or to compromise, as the case may be. And our relationship deepens each time I hear them, and I get chills each time I learn more about the fascinating, wonderful, unique individual each one of them is. They’re their own selves, and there’s something absolutely amazing about that.

Your dog is her own self too, with her own opinions and passions. The choice of how you “parent” her is all yours. Please step lightly and choose wisely. Your dog may not be able to opt out, but she can opt in to a lifelong relationship with you. And that’s a beautiful, powerful thing.

[Mostly] Wordless Wednesday

Photo by sangudo on flickr.

Photo by sangudo on flickr.

“Grab a chance and you won’t be sorry for a might-have-been.” -Arthur Ransome

Contest: What’s in a Trout?

Trout (also known as Mischief) is almost 2 years old, and she’s matured into a lovely little dog. She likes everybody, and her sweet demeanor and easygoing personality make her a great little companion. Like most young dogs, she still has her share of challenges – she tends to be whiny in new or exciting situations and cats don’t like her nearly as much as she adores them – but all in all, she’s a wonderful pet.

At 1 year of age. Photo by Sara Brueske.

Around 1 year of age. Photo by Sara Brueske.

Last week, I ordered a Mars Wisdom Panel for Trout. This test uses a DNA sample taken by swabbing your dog’s cheek and compares the results against their database of 209 different dog breeds to help determine your dog’s ancestry.

Picture taken one month ago.

Picture taken one month ago.

While I think tests like this are more of a fun game than a scientific certainty, it’s always interesting to play “guess the breed.”

Puppy picture! She was between 5-6 months old here.

Puppy picture! She was between 5-6 months old here.

That’s where you come in. Post your breed mix guesses in the comments section. When I get Trout’s breed results back I will post them here and the closest guess will win a prize! If there are multiple correct commenters I will award two prizes: one to the first person who guessed that breed combination and another to a randomly-drawn guesser. Make sure you include your email address or website in your comment so that I can contact you about claiming your prize, or I’ll give it to someone else.

Photo by SC Studios when she was about a year old.

Photo by SC Studios when she was about a year old.

As far as what this has to do with dog training… well, you’ll just have to stay tuned for future blog posts on the matter.

Trout's natural coat before it was stripped.

Trout’s natural coat before it was stripped.

Throughout this post are some photos of Trout, who at a little under 2 years of age weighs 29 pounds and measures about 20 inches at her shoulders. She has a mixed coat: the brown spots are short and smooth, while the white areas are medium-length and wiry. I keep the coat over her shoulders and back stripped out or it will grow to about 6-8″ (maybe longer – I didn’t wait to find out!). It’s unknown whether her tail is a natural bob, a birth defect, a purposeful crop, or the result of an injury. She has dew claws on all four feet. In addition to whining, she has a full-throated bark and makes several different yodeling and baying sounds. Trout was abandoned as a young puppy on a trout farm in Missouri (hence her nickname!) and came to me as a foster dog after she was transported to Minnesota.

She's about a year old here. Photo by SC Studios.

She’s about a year old here. Photo by SC Studios.

Happy guessing, followers!

Picture taken at about 18 months. Photo by A Dog Spot.

Picture taken somewhere around 18 months of age by A Dog Spot.

Gallery

Nose Work Class Photos

This gallery contains 18 photos.

We love K9 Nose Work! Any dog (and any handler!) can participate, and the dogs think it’s the best game ever. Check out these great shots from last week’s Beginning K9 Nose Work class by Laura Caldwell. Want to start playing with … Continue reading

[Mostly] Wordless Wednesday

Photo by Kerry Sanders

Photo by Kerry Sanders

“Nine tenths of education is encouragement.”

– Anatole France

Belly Rub Redux

Last week we discussed the different reasons a dog may offer his belly. While some dogs really do want belly rubs, other dogs will offer their belly as a distance increasing signal. In those cases, their belly-up posture is a polite way to ask you to leave them alone.

So, how did you do on our quiz? Below are the same group of dogs as last week, with more information on their body language.

Mona Lisa

Mona Lisa’s body is loose and floppy, with soft, squinty eyes and a relaxed posture. Rub that belly!

Donovan

Donovan is doing everything he can to ask you to leave him alone short of growling or biting. His eyes are wide with dilated pupils, his ears are back, he’s licking his lips, his face and muscles are tight, his mouth is closed, and his front legs are held stiffly over his belly. No belly rubs for Donovan, and you should probably back away to help him feel less worried.

199

Layla’s loose and floppy, with an open mouth and a big smile. Her muscles are nice and relaxed. Rub that belly!

Abraham

Abraham is showing some conflicted body language. While his mouth is open and his tongue is flopped out, we have no way of knowing whether this is due to heat or if he’s truly relaxed. His eyes are wide (and may be whale eyed, although this could also be due to the angle he has to look to see the camera). His muscles look pretty tense (check out the ridges around his mouth and eyes) and his ears are back. Take a step away and speak happily to him, then use his response to determine whether he really wanted a belly rub or is glad that you gave him some space. If he bounces over to you and flops on the ground again, rub that belly. If he stays where he is or disengages, you were probably right to leave him alone.

Boomer

Boomer’s mouth is closed, his eyes are wide and worried with dilated pupils, and his ears are back. Give this puppy some space and let him approach you when he feels ready.

Bob

Bob’s having a blast! He’s pretty busy playing, and may or may not enjoy a belly rub. Since his body language is soft and loose, you can certainly approach him. He may appreciate a back rub, where you slide your hand between his body and the ground and rub up and down, more than a belly rub at this point. Help him reach the itchy spots!

Harry

Harry most definitely does not want to be approached, and he might bite if you push the issue. His mouth is closed so tightly that he has muscle ridges around it and around his eyes. His eyes are big and round, and he’s displaying whale eyes. One of his paws is curled tightly against his body, and the other is held up in preparation to push you away if you keep approaching. Back away from Harry and let him approach you on his own terms.

Remember, dogs who truly want their bellies rubbed will be loose and floppy, with soft eyes and wiggly bodies. If your dog appears tense, looks away from you, has wide eyes (or whale eyes), licks her lips, or shows other signs of stress, she’s probably asking you to back off. This body language is known as a “tap out” or “inguinal exposure,” and should be respected by giving the dog space to feel more comfortable.

So, how did you do? Are you a belly rub expert? Let us know in the comments section!